You are here

Daily Meditations

Sat Jun 15 2013

Today and each Saturday you are invited to join with the faithful people around te world by saying Morning or Evening prayer at http://thetrinitymission.org orhttp://dailyoffice.org.  You can find these daily prayers in the  Book of Common Prayer as well.  Morning Prayer begins on page 75 and Evening prayer on page 115.  If you have specific prayer requests, please email them to office@stmattsepiscopal.org and the prayer team will include them in their prayers on Sunday morning before worship.
The Reverend William Exner

Fri Jun 14 2013

Lead me, O LORD, in your righteousness, because of those who lie in wait for me;  make your way straight before me. Psalm 5:8   Lead me, O Lord! There are so many times when we just want to grab onto God and demand the answer. Just lead me! Tell me what to do!! Sometimes a way opens up, and sometimes it doesn't. Sometimes the answer is what we want to hear, and sometimes what we dread. The best news in it all is that Christ is present, that God's Holy Spirit will never abandon us, that in the end, and at our end, God has led us, because we travel and arrive in Christ's loving presence. May you know Christ's love and presence in all you do this day. The Psalms Every Sunday one of the readings is from the Psalms. Sometimes it is said in unison, sometimes as a call and response, sometimes it is chanted, sometimes sung, yet the words of Israel's song book are there. The reciting of the Psalms has been for centuries a central aspect Christian's daily connection with God. Like the rest of the Bible, these poems contain the whole of human life, the light and the dark. This week's meditations are on the psalm that we will hear this upcoming Sunday. I pray that they may water your soul, and help you enter more deeply into your life in Christ.   -Linnae Peterson, M.Div.
Linnae Peterson, M.Div.

Thu Jun 13 2013

"But as for me, through the greatness of your mercy I will go into your house;  I will bow down toward your holy temple in awe of you." Psalm 5:7 "Praying for mercy doesn't just mean 'I've done something wrong, so please forgive me.' It's a much wider petition, asking that God send his merciful presence and help in a thousand and one situations, despite the fact that we don't deserve such aid and never could." N. T. Wright, Simply Christian   I came across this quote recently. (I commend the whole book to you, it's wonderful.) It opens up to me a whole new way of both thinking about and praying for mercy. One of the oldest prayers we use on Sunday's are the phrases Lord have mercy, Christ have mercy, Lord have mercy. In them we pray beyond ourselves, we pray God's mercy on the whole world in those thousand and one situations, some of which we know and some of which we do not. Lord have mercy.  Join us in praying that God have mercy on our world. The Psalms Every Sunday one of the readings is from the Psalms. Sometimes it is said in unison, sometimes as a call and response, sometimes it is chanted, sometimes sung, yet the words of Israel's song book are there. The reciting of the Psalms has been for centuries a central aspect Christian's daily connection with God. Like the rest of the Bible, these poems contain the whole of human life, the light and the dark. This week's meditations are on the psalm that we will hear this upcoming Sunday. I pray that they may water your soul, and help you enter more deeply into your life in Christ.   -Linnae Peterson, M.Div.
Linnae Peterson, M.Div.

Wed Jun 12 2013

In the morning, LORD, you hear my voice;  early in the morning I make my appeal and watch for you. Psalm 5:3   God hears your voice, loud or soft, angry or pleading, laughing or crying, God hears your voice. Even in the silence of the night, when everyone and everything is silent, God hears your voice. During the day with the phone ringing and your email pinging and everyone wanting a piece of you, God hears your particular voice. Across a room full of other voices, God knows your voice, God knows you. Trust this day that God hears you, and wishes to hear your sweet voice. The Psalms Every Sunday one of the readings is from the Psalms. Sometimes it is said in unison, sometimes as a call and response, sometimes it is chanted, sometimes sung, yet the words of Israel's song book are there. The reciting of the Psalms has been for centuries a central aspect Christian's daily connection with God. Like the rest of the Bible, these poems contain the whole of human life, the light and the dark. This week's meditations are on the psalm that we will hear this upcoming Sunday. I pray that they may water your soul, and help you enter more deeply into your life in Christ.   -Linnae Peterson, M.Div.
Linnae Peterson, M.Div.

Tue Jun 11 2013

Hearken to my cry for help, my King and my God,  for I make my prayer to you. Psalm 5: 2 I've come to love the daily prayers in the Book of Common Prayer. Morning Prayer, NoonPrayer, Evening Prayer, and Compline provide a structure to hang my day on. Now don't misunderstand, I'm not regular about these formal prayers as much as I would like to be, yet when I do participate they uphold me. N. T. Wright refers to these well-crafted prayers as the boots that can help us travel along the road. These prayers push me beyond my own world, beyond my own preoccupations. So give it a try. Compline (BCP pg. 127) is perhaps the best place to start. Choose one of the Psalms listed, and one of the readings. Take a deep breath and jump in, or try praying with http://thetrinitymission.org.   Or want something different? Try www.northumbriacommunity.org Are there prayers that have fed you? Keep a journal of those things that you can turn to, that are the "boots" that fit you.   The Psalms Every Sunday one of the readings is from the Psalms. Sometimes it is said in unison, sometimes as a call and response, sometimes it is chanted, sometimes sung, yet the words of Israel's song book are there. The reciting of the Psalms has been for centuries a central aspect Christian's daily connection with God. Like the rest of the Bible, these poems contain the whole of human life, the light and the dark. This week's meditations are on the psalm that we will hear this upcoming Sunday. I pray that they may water your soul, and help you enter more deeply into your life in Christ.   -Linnae Peterson, M.Div.
Linnae Peterson, M.Div.

Monday June 10

Give ear to my words, O LORD;  consider my meditation. Psalm 5:1   Over the years meditation has become an important form of prayer for me. It has not been something that has come easily for me. My mind and my body are too restless for this to be a native talent. In college I hung out with an eclectic crowd of evangelicals, Episcopalians, charismatics, and seekers. The expectation was that everyone would have a morning "quiet time" of prayer and Bible study. For me the time was fine, I've always been an early riser, but quiet? Still? Count me out. So I started walking. The rhythm and motion helped to focus my heart and mind in the early morning light. Later the rhythm of swimming took its place. Now things have shifted and changed again and I can sit in stillness and place myself in the presence of Christ.   The time and manner of prayer changes for us throughout our lives. What is helpful or unhelpful to you?   The Psalms Every Sunday one of the readings is from the Psalms. Sometimes it is said in unison, sometimes as a call and response, sometimes it is chanted, sometimes sung, yet the words of Israel's song book are there. The reciting of the Psalms has been for centuries a central aspect Christian's daily connection with God. Like the rest of the Bible, these poems contain the whole of human life, the light and the dark. This week's meditations are on the psalm that we will hear this upcoming Sunday. I pray that they may water your soul, and help you enter more deeply into your life in Christ.   -Linnae Peterson, M.Div.
Linnae Peterson, M.Div.

Saturday June 8

Today and each Saturday you are invited to join with the faithful people around te world by saying Morning or Evening prayer at http://thetrinitymission.org orhttp://dailyoffice.org.  You can find these daily prayers in the  Book of Common Prayer as well.  Morning Prayer begins on page 75 and Evening prayer on page 115.  If you have specific prayer requests, please email them tooffice@stmattsepiscopal.org and the prayer team will include them in their prayers on Sunday morning before worship.
The Reverend William Exner

Friday June 7

"When you see only waves, you might miss the water. But if you are mindful, you will be able to touch the water. Once you are capable of touching the water, you will not mind the coming and going of the waves. You are no longer afraid. You are no longer upset about the beginning or the end of the wave, or that the wave is higher or lower, more or less beautiful." Living Buddha, Living Christ, Thich Nhat Hanh    Where have I seen God today? This is my favorite spiritual practice. And the more I ask myself this question, the less often I actually have to ask it. Instead I will often instantly recognize and appreciate God that is always with me - in the beauty of the flowering tress of spring or in parents volunteering seemingly endless hours at the baseball field or girl scout meetings. And I continue this practice, so that I continue to see God in new ways around me - no matter what waves I am in.    Jill Desrochers, Sunday School Coordinator Parishioner since 2006
Jill Desrochers

Thursday June 6

"The kingdom that Jesus preached and lived was all about a glorious, uproarious, absurd generosity. Think of the best thing you can do for the worst person, and go ahead and do it. Think of what you'd really like someone to do for you, and do it for them. Think of the people to whom you are tempted to be nasty, and lavish generosity on them instead. These instructions have a fresh, spring like quality. They are all about new life bursting out energetically, like flowers growing through concrete and startling everyone with their color and vigor. " (N. T. Wright, Luke for Everyone).
N. T. Wright

Pages

Subscribe to Front page feed